Batter Licker

April 6, 2012

rye croutons

There’s been a lot of hubbub in San Francisco about finally having a Legitimate Jewish Deli, in the form of Wise Sons‘ Mission district location.

I have two thoughts on that:

(1) These people clearly haven’t been to Moishe’s Pippic in Hayes Valley, which has been serving phenomenal corned beef, pastrami and (on Fridays and Saturdays only) brisket for quite awhile now; and

(2) The rye bread at Wise Sons is transformative, at least as far as this longtime Rye-Hater is concerned.

Wise Sons’ rye bread is absolutely worth the annoyance of trying to find a parking spot in the Mission on a weekend afternoon. Hypothetically, I think it’s even worth waiting in the horrendously long line that wraps around the corner starting at 11 a.m. on weekends, when Wise Sons starts serving their infamous Reuben sandwiches. And I say “hypothetically” because of this very-exciting-to-me-now-that-I-know-it fact: (more…)

February 10, 2011

versatile unseasoned bread crumbs

Filed under: bread — Tags: , , , , , — Kristen @ 9:01 am

I love bread, but I don’t purchase it often. Sometimes, I get a little ambitious and make it myself. Other times, I do end up purchasing fresh bread, only to end up with unwanted scraps, end pieces, and extra hunks or slices that wind up getting stale. When you’re buy a one-pound loaf for two people, there’s just not much hope of going through it all within the first 24 hours while it’s still fresh. These sad, neglected bits of bread are the inevitable result.

As part of my ongoing effort to waste less food by finding new ways to use every edible item I buy (even the ones that have seen better days), I started shoving bread into the freezer, promising myself that I would decide what to do with it later. A few months and a freezer bag full of unloved bread scraps later, I decided to make bread crumbs.

When I decided to make my own bread crumbs, I initially flip-flopped over whether to season them. I decided against seasoning for a few reasons. (more…)

December 25, 2010

pizza dough cinnamon rolls with vanilla-espresso cream cheese glaze

Pizza Dough Cinnamon Rolls
Makes 2 6-inch pans (about 12 mini rolls 2 inches in diameter and 1 inch deep)

1 package Whole Foods fresh pizza dough (about the size of a softball)
8 Tbsp. butter, divided and softened
1/4 c. sugar
2 Tbsp. ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp. salt
flour for rolling out dough

Remove dough from refrigerator, cover lightly with a towel, and let rise for 60 to 90 minutes.

Preheat oven to 375F, and butter bottom and sides of two 6- or 7-inch round baking pans with 1 Tbsp. softened butter per pan.

Sprinkle counter with flour, and roll out dough into a rectangle until 1/4-inch thick. Spread 4 Tbsp. softened butter over entire surface of dough. Sprinkle sugar and salt evenly over the butter, and then sprinkle cinnamon generously over the sugar.

For mini rolls, tightly roll the long end of the rectangular dough over itself, and pinch end of dough against body of dough to seal, using a little warm water on your fingertips to seal the edges as needed. (If you prefer larger rolls, roll the short end over itself, and seal in the same fashion.)

Using a pastry cutter or very sharp knife, slice cinnamon log into 1-inch thick rolls. Do ahead: cinnamon rolls can wrapped tightly in plastic wrap and frozen at this point; defrost in refrigerator one day prior to baking.

Place rolls in buttered round baking pans, leaving a little space between each roll to give it room to rise. Top each cinnamon roll with a small bit of softened butter, evenly distributing the remaining 2 Tbsp. softened butter between the rolls.

Bake for 12 to 15 minutes, until top of rolls is only slightly golden. Remove from oven, and top warm rolls with Vanilla-Espresso Cream Cheese Glaze (recipe below). Serve immediately.

Vanilla-Espresso Cream Cheese Glaze

4 oz. cream cheese or neufchatel cheese (lower in fat and calories, but works equally well in frosting), softened
1/3 c. powdered sugar
1/4 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. vanilla extract
1/4 tsp. finely ground espresso or coffee beans

Mix together all ingredients until combined. Zap in microwave for 15 seconds if needed to further soften the cream cheese and make the mixture more pourable. Spread over warm cinnamon rolls.

March 23, 2010

corned beef hash and cheese bread

Filed under: bread — Tags: , , , , , — Kristen @ 11:24 pm

I’m a huge fan of corned beef hash. In fact, whenever I wander into Red’s on a Saturday morning afternoon after having had too much fun the previous night, I get excited when I re-remember that corned beef hash is their Saturday specialty. But as I was looking at the heaping pile of leftovers from St. Patrick’s Day, I thought there must be something else to do with the delicious corned beef and potatoes besides throwing them onto a griddle until they brown up. And what about the flavorful broth leftover from cooking the beef, potatoes and cabbage? There’s gotta be something better than cabbage soup! And then it came to me: prosciutto bread.

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You see, several months back, I came across an Italian prosciutto-cheese bread recipe that sounded so delicious, I wanted to make it right then. But then I forgot about it. Until now. If Italians can have prosciutto-cheese bread, what’s keeping us (semi-) Irish from having an equally delicious cured-meat-and-cheese bread of our own? And thus Irish corned beef and cheese bread was born – and let me tell you: this bread is amazingly yummy. (more…)

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